Wednesday, July 29, 2015

Copper + Steel = Galvanic Reaction Is Not Good for Home Owners!

    Home Inspection Galvanic Reaction Solid State


Unless you work regularly with metals or have a really good memory of high school physics, galvanic reactions are not something you may have heard about for a long time but it may be a problem developing in your home.

What is a Galvanic Reaction?
When two dissimilar metals are allowed to touch, there is a chemical reaction that takes place at the atomic level which can allow the metals to deteriorate and rust prematurely. The rate and intensity of this reaction is based on the different electronic potentials between two dissimilar metals.

Why is Galvanic Reaction a Problem for Homes?
In our homes we have natural gas and water constantly under pressure. Copper lines that are commonly used for both are highly susceptible to this galvanic reaction and if these lines are allowed to contact steel ducting, aluminum strapping, or are joined incorrectly to iron piping, the copper will oxidize (rust) and create holes.

In the case of natural gas, we risk a house explosion from leaking gas fumes and in the case of cold water, we risk major flood damage. In some cases where there is a large amount of hot water, such as a hot water heaters, we risk flood damage and possible personal burn injuries from hot water if we are too near it when a pipe may fail.

How do I know if I have a Galvanic Reaction Risk?
You need to understand if the correct building materials that should be in place. This can be difficult to see when materials are concealed behind finishes but a SitePro Home Inspector is trained to watch for possible galvanic reaction points. Also, plumbers, pipe fitters, electricians, and other trades are also trained to watch for these possible problems in their areas of expertise. 

Unfortunately too many handy people are not aware of this galvanic reaction and will use incorrect materials. Always hire qualified trades people to work on your home as many risks of using unqualified people can take years to develop but are a safety concern for you and your family.

SitePro, LLC
Van Hibberts

362 Gulf Breeze Parkway, #214
Gulf Breeze, Florida 32561
850.934.6800  (Office)
850.485.3209  (Cell / Text Msg)

Certified Residential Building Code Inspector ICC-5319905
Florida-State Certified Master Home Inspector Lic. #HI89
Florida-Certified Wind Mitigation Inspector
203(k) FHA/HUD Consultant #A0900
WDO Certificate #JE190791 
NACHI #10071802
"Looking Beyond The Obvious"



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Sunday, July 26, 2015

Simplifying Your Home for the Future



Whether you’re embarking on general updates or a full remodel, there are a number of changes you can incorporate into your project that can help your home evolve to fit your future needs. Learn more: http://thd.co/independent_living

Thursday, July 23, 2015

Hurricane Preparedness C - A Checklist - 23 Vital and Easy and Simple Supplies

When a hurricane strikes, the worst thing that can happen is being unprepared. The second worst thing is to waste time gathering the wrong supplies in an attempt to get prepared. Getting ready for Hurricane Season doesn't have to cost ridiculous amounts of money, nor do you need to build a fallout bunker to hide in for years. With the right checklist of essential supplies, you can ride out the storm and its aftermath with less stress and with a strategic advantage. Here is a list of 23 vital items that will help you be well-prepared for a disaster emergency - and it all starts with a relatively inexpensive thick-walled foam cooler.

    Thick Walled Foam Cooler Ice Chest - a superior grade, 1 1/2 to 2 inch thick, fully fused EPS foam cooler will cost so much less than a hard shell plastic or metal cooler that you can buy quite a few of them and come nowhere near the painful expense of hard-surface brands. That means you can have more storage ability and even have some left over for neighbors, friends, or relatives where themselves may wind up in need. The thermal qualities of high-grade foam coolers allow for keeping items cold for days when properly packed, and you'll find that emergency management organizations often neglect to provide disaster area residents with such a simple, fundamental necessity. So, while other people are worrying about what to do with the bags of ice that they collect from FEMA or the Red Cross in the blazing summer heat, you'll be able to take along your light-weight, reliable cooler to protect your cold stuff from the heat.

  •     Batteries - multiple sizes! Someone else may have a radio or other info-gathering device if yours breaks.
  •     Water - bottled or in plastic jugs. Some can keep in the foam cooler, while the rest can be stored somewhere in the shade to prevent your water stash from getting too hot.
  •     Charcoal - useful for grilling and cooking even without a charcoal grill.
  •     Mosquito Repellant - there's no need to suffer when swarms kick up due to stagnant water sources that result from deluges of rain.
  •     First Aid Supplies - if some of those supplies are temperature sensitive, use the foam coolers to keep them protected from the heat.
  •     Food - canned and non-perishable. Once a can of food is opened or prepared, leftovers can go in the thermal-insulated foam cooler.
  •     Disposable plates, cups, utensils
  •     Baby Needs - formula, diapers, and other necessities. Use the foam cooler to keep formula and baby food cool.
  •     Spare Clothes - protected in plastic or another waterproof method.
  •     Prescription Medications - consult a pharmacist to learn what temperature ranges are best for a particular type of medicine.
  •     Pet Medications - consult the veterinarian to learn what temperature ranges are best for a particular type of pet medicine.
  •     Plastic Garbage Bags - thick ones, large. Definitely come in handy.
  •     Cleaning Supplies - storm damage can be messy, even unsanitary.
  •     Children's Toys - to keep the young ones occupied and entertained.
  •     Pet Food - dry food will last longer than canned wet foods.
  •     Ice - bagged, can be kept in freezer until transferred for use in foam cooler.
  •     Candles - lots of them, without dye colorings that can cause irritating smoke.
  •     Canned Drinks - non-soda is better for the body - healthy fruit juices and such.
  •     Sterno - for cooking.
  •     Propane - serves for cooking, and in some cases for heating.
  •     Bleach - both for cleaning and appropriate disinfectant purposes.
  •     Dish Detergent - will clean well and still good enough for washing clothing.
When it comes to making yourself ready for a strong tropical storm or hurricane, having a well-made foam cooler ice chest is an essential focal point to ensure that you can more easily bear the brunt of the aftermath when the power is out and you need to keep items protected from the heat of the sun. The low cost, reliability, and even the fact that they make great flotation make the decision to purchase at least one a very practical idea.

My name is Riley Marquette and I'm a content provider for http://www.loboy.com and The Bear Facts (Lifestyle) Blog. I'm an admitted, unabashed, stark raving fan of LoBoy Foam Coolers and Insul-Pak Insulated Foam Shippers and other related Magna Manufacturing, Inc. products. It's not about the cooler - it's about the FUN YOU HAVE WITH THE COOLER!


By Riley Marquette
Expert Author Riley Marquette
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Riley_Marquette

Monday, July 20, 2015

New Dropdown Menu for Real Estate Agents to Attain Free Online Continuing Education


Provided by SitePro Inspections


We released a new Continuing Education dropdown menu for real estate agents. You must include my InterNACHI ID # 10071802

Click here to get started: Education for Real Estate Agents



Van Hibberts, CMI

Certified Residential Building Code Inspector ICC-5319905
IBHS Fortified  Certified Inspector  #FEV32561020109
ARA Certified Inspector #20302 (Applied Research Associates)
Florida-State Certified Master Inspector Lic. #HI 89
Certified Owens-Corning Roof Data Inspector
Florida-Certified Wind Mitigation Inspector
WDO Certificate #JE190791
InterNACHI #10071802
362 Gulf Breeze Parkway, #214
Gulf Breeze, Florida 32561

850.934.6800  (Office)                                         

850.485.3209  (Cell / Text Msg)                         


"Looking Beyond The Obvious"



Nothing in this message is intended to constitute an electronic signature unless a specific statement to the contrary is included in this message.

DISCLAIMER: The information in this communication is confidential and may be legally privileged. It is intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom it is addressed and other authorized to receive it. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution or taking any action in reliance of the contents of this information is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful. If you have received this message in error, please contact the sender immediately by return e-mail. SitePro LLC is neither liable for the proper nor complete transmission of the information contained in this communication nor for any delay in its receipt.

SitePro Residential and Commercial Inspections has taken every reasonable precaution to ensure that any attachment to this e-mail has been swept for viruses. However, we cannot accept liability for any damage sustained as a result of viruses and would advise that you carry out your own virus check before opening any attachment. This e-mail is meant to communicate company related materials only. Opinions expressed by the author of this e-mail are solely his/her own. SitePro Residential and Commericial Inspections will not be liable for opinions expressed in this e-mail.



Saturday, July 18, 2015

What Is It? | Black Ball with Red Legs



Landscape contractor Roger Cook asks host Kevin O'Connor, general contractor Tom Silva, and plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey to guess what this black rod with red bristles might be.

Click here to SUBSCRIBE to the official This Old House YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c...

Full episode: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y0mBL...

Thursday, July 16, 2015

Wiremold: How to Install the Flat Screen TV Cord & Cable Power Kit



The Wiremold Flat Screen TV Cord and Cable Power Kit is easy to install. No electrician or hard wiring is required and installs in under 30 minutes.

http://www.legrand.us/wiremold/at-hom...

Tuesday, July 14, 2015

How To Install A Laminate Floor



Laminate flooring has the same great look as wood flooring and installation is easy with an array of styles and colors. For this project you will need laminate flooring, a jigsaw, a circular saw, miter saw, spacers, weights, a tapping block, dead blow hammer, pull bar, a tape measure, a pencil, a utility knife, a level, wood glue, silicone sealant and transitions/moldings.

Before you begin your laminate flooring installation, learn how to prep a concrete subfloor here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bF0iG3... or a plywood subfloor here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z4a985...

Sunday, July 12, 2015

How to Lay the Foundation for a Patio or Walkway



A well prepared foundation for your patio is crucial and the most important step. The patio base will include two layers: gravel and leveling sand. Before you begin make sure that you contact a professional to check for gas or electric lines. Start by digging the trench so you can lay the base. You will need a wheelbarrow, garden spade, shovel, gloves, nylon mason string, steaks, a line level, hammer and a plate compactor.

In our area we need to excavate about 7 inches of soil. Use your shovel and garden spade to dig up the sod. Set the sod aside and water so you can use it later once your pavers are down. If you have stairs, dig around and underneath so you can set pavers under the stairs. Dig the remaining sod out. As you dig, use a tape measure and level to make sure you are excavating the right depth and have an even surface. Once you are done digging, use the plate compactor to level and compact loose dirt.

Lay the landscape cloth inside the patio base. Next, fill 4" of base, compact the surface and lightly wet so it can clump together. Continue to run the compactor over the base until it is fully compacted and there is no loose dirt. To lay the sand you will need two one inch pieces of PVC pipe and one 2'x4'. Set the PVC pipe on top of the patio base. Next add about an inch of sand, so you that you almost cover the PVC pipe. Run the 2'x4' perpendicular to the PVC pipe to even out and level the sand. Remove the PVC pipe and fill the places where the pipes were with sand. Wet the sand just enough so that it doesn't clump. Finally make sure the sand is uniform, level and compacted and you are ready to install your pavers. Learn how to build your patio here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eqV7Yu...

Friday, July 10, 2015

How to Use a Tile Cutter



http://books.gregvan.com/ How to Use a Tile Cutter watch this video if you need more information on how to use a ceramic tile cutter. Don't forget to check out our website to find some of the most popular books on home remodeling.

Wednesday, July 8, 2015

Piece By Piece: Rebuilding Homes And Lives With Fire Damage Restoration


The devastation a house fire leaves in its wake is unimaginable, unless you've experienced it firsthand. The abrupt nature of the disaster is perhaps what contributes the most to the tragedy; a family might be going about its everyday business as usual, and within only a few hours their home and way of life are swept out from under them in a bitter blaze. After the firefighters put out the flames, a fire damage restoration crew can make all the difference in what is lost and what is saved.

The Role of the Crew

Firefighters are heroes, and the restoration crew is a team of angels. This group of workers enters the home once everything is clear. Their mission is to save as much of the home as possible. Their work must be quick, thorough and efficient; they must be knowledgeable about the various methods used to save and restore a family's home and possessions. These skilled and dedicated people work on the burned home until they've done everything possible to restore the household's belongings.

Initial Cleanup

Clearing the soot is key when fire damage restoration experts start their work. They clean any objects around the home that are found intact. Even light fixtures and lampshades are cleaned. Ozone deodorization or thermal fogging is performed to rid the home of any smoky smell. If the smell is too strong to be removed completely, the objects in question are sealed with pigmented lacquer that protects their integrity and traps the odor. Soot is eliminated thoroughly with smoke-residue removal tools. The key goal is to remove soot and deodorize the home within 24 hours of the disaster. If the home is not treated within this sensitive time period, the building may sustain irreparable damage.

Storage, Restoration, and Reconstruction

Once the extent of damage is assessed and the initial cleanup completed, a restoration crew will pack and remove the household's belongings. Whatever can be saved will be brought to a storage facility. Certain objects, such as electronics and clothing, may be taken to a facility where advanced restoration is performed. Technicians can revive electronics using anti-static HEPA vacuums and filtered air compressors.

Back at the home, extensive sanitation efforts take place. Water damage due to microbial amplification often causes a secondary layer of damage that must be removed with turbo dryers. The home is properly ventilated and dehumidified, at which point reconstruction can begin.

Fire damage restoration crews are passionate about helping families return to their normal lives after an unforeseen disaster. Their efforts, combined with their specialized technology, allow them to work quickly and efficiently to reverse the effects of the catastrophe as much as possible. Although their work cannot erase the event entirely, it enables families to move on and adopt a new state of normal instead of facing the pain of losing everything they own.

When looking for professionals specializing in fire damage restoration, Harrisburg, PA residents should consult http://www.restorationservice.com/index.php/fire-and-smoke-restoration.
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Andrew_Stratton

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/9065185

Monday, July 6, 2015

Utility Room - Often the most dangerous room in the home!


A professional SitePro home inspection is not just about looking for defects in a home, it is also about identifying the building materials present by their defining characteristics.

Utility rooms are typically an area of the home where the SitePro inspector can identify the largest numbers of building materials present, this is often the most dangerous room in the home

Safety First
Before a home inspector storms their way into the utility room, it is typically safest to have a good look around. As utility rooms are often unfinished spaces, they often are neglected in maintenance which can lead to safety hazards. Also, many amateur handy-people have been known to ignorantly leave major safety hazards about waiting to hurt an unsuspecting visitor.

Here are some things to watch for before and as you enter the utility room:

·    Lighting - Is there some form of lighting for the room? It is not uncommon for light switches to be missing cover panels or sometimes the whole switch with just bare wires sticking out. Look for pull chords on wall mounted or overhead bulbs. Use your flashlight until you have safe room lighting.
·        
      Head Clearance - Utility rooms often have low hanging equipment or shelves mounted in unexpected places with sharp corners. Be particularly careful where you may be kneeling or standing up or down for anything that could injure you
·         
      Standing Water - Standing water can have many safety risks, first, there is the risks of electricity and water in a space with many mechanical systems. Second, the water may have dangerous bacteria or other contaminants (it may not even be water), and lastly, it is a slip hazard. Don’t try to clean up spills you didn’t make. If you can’t safely work around it, document it as a limitation to your inspection and safely move on.
·        
      Other - There are many possible other safety issues such as gas leaks, open flames, or hot equipment. Use caution as you move around the room to various areas.

Floors, Ceilings, and Structure
  • ·          If no other area of the home reveals the structure, you can often get some idea what to report on based on observations in the utility room.
  • ·         Things you may be able to observe include:
  • ·         Types, styles, sizes, and spacing of joists in floors above
  • ·         Material, configuration, and installation practices of sub-floor above (e.g. is the plywood glued?)
  • ·         The presence of conventional wood joists or of engineered joists
  • ·         Correct connections of joists to exterior walls or beams
  • ·         Confirm the material for the sub-floor under the utility room (if you see wood, either you are not at the lowest level or you need to be looking for a crawlspace access)
  • ·         Look for signs of over-notching, heavily damaged, missing, or cut structural elements.
Plumbing
When it comes to plumbing systems, you need to be watching for the main materials and paths of water flow in the home. We will look more closely at each system at the next steps in the utility room inspection but this is a good chance to familiarize yourself with materials for your report.
  • ·         Water Supply - Can you identify the main home water shutoff in the utility room? What is the supply material? What is the diameter of the pipe? Is there a pressure reducing valve?
  • ·         Home Water Piping - Can you identify what primary materials are present for water supply piping? Are they correctly attached and appear to be free of leaks or other issues? Is there any polybutylene which is at a higher risk of leaks? Are there any legacy materials such as galvanized piping which could be an issue for the client?
  • ·         Drain Piping - What are the primary materials visible for drains and drain stacks? Are there any legacy materials that need to be reported? If the main drain from the home is above the level of the basement floor, is there a sump of some sort for any basement drains or plumbing? Are any P-traps visible for upstairs fixtures?
  • ·         Plumbing Venting - What is the material visible for the plumbing venting? Does it appear to be in correct configurations?
Electrical
We will cover more on electricity in a separate article in this series but you should be observing electrical systems that are visible in the utility room. What types of wiring is present? Are connections made in junction boxes? Are junction boxes overloaded with wires? Is there armored cable serving furnaces and hot water equipment? Are there exposed wires unprotected? Are there staples in the wires at changes of direction and near box connections?

Natural Gas
The inspection of natural gas materials varies depending on the materials present:
  
  • Black Iron - Connections twisted together? Strapping in place to keep system protected?
  • Copper - Are the connections pressure fit (never soldered)? Is the copper marked every 6-feet with the work gas or yellow tape/paint? Is it well secured?
  • Flexible Hose - Are the fittings secure and the material has some slack to it?
  • Galvanic Reactions - Galvanic reactions occur when two dissimilar metals touch such as copper and steel. Electrons from one metal attempt to migrate to the other metal and create an oxidization of one of the materials which could result in gas leaks. Dissimilar metals, particularly with natural gas, should never be allowed to touch without some type of inert barrier between them.

  • Fuel Shut-Offs - Are there visible gas shut-offs for both local appliances and for sections of the gas system as a whole?
  • Smell Test - If you are concerned about a gas connection, give it a good sniff for any signs of even minor leaks.

Heating and Cooling
Heating and cooling materials will vary greatly depending on the heating systems present. Some typical items to observe before the detailed system inspections:

Forced air - What are the materials for moving both the supply air and the heater air? Are they well attached?

A/C - Does it share the blower with the furnace or a separate air handler? What materials are involved?

Hot Water Heating - What is the piping material and how do the pipes distribute in the home?

Final Thoughts
With experience, a home inspector will learn to identify all these materials in passing and will know where to look for typical signs of incorrect installation or deterioration. A great home inspector will be able to keep the various materials in mind as they travel through the rest of the home and not discrepancies or changes in materials which may indicated updates, repairs, or additions.
Unfortunately for home inspectors, we are limited to visual observations and many home systems are concealed behind finished surfaces. For that reason, the utility room may be the best location in the home to observe some materials needed for a compete home inspection report.


Van Hibberts, CMI

Certified Residential Building Code Inspector ICC-5319905
Florida-State Certified Master Home Inspector Lic. #HI89
Florida-Certified Wind Mitigation Inspector
203(k) FHA/HUD Consultant #A0900
WDO Certificate #JE190791 
NACHI #10071802
362 Gulf Breeze Parkway, #214
Gulf Breeze, Florida 32561
850.934.6800  (Office)
850.485.3209  (Cell / Text Msg)
"Looking Beyond The Obvious"


Nothing in this message is intended to constitute an electronic signature unless a specific statement to the contrary is included in this message.

DISCLAIMER: The information in this communication is confidential and may be legally privileged. It is intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom it is addressed and other authorized to receive it. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution or taking any action in reliance of the contents of this information is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful. If you have received this message in error, please contact the sender immediately by return e-mail. SitePro LLC is neither liable for the proper nor complete transmission of the information contained in this communication nor for any delay in its receipt.

SitePro Residential and Commericial Inspections has taken every reasonable precaution to ensure that any attachment to this e-mail has been swept for viruses. However, we cannot accept liability for any damage sustained as a result of viruses and would advise that you carry out your own virus check before opening any attachment. This e-mail is meant to communicate company related materials only. Opinions expressed by the author of this e-mail are solely his/her own. SitePro Residential and Commericial Inspections will not be liable for opinions expressed in this e-mail.

Saturday, July 4, 2015

Contract Advice for Hiring Contractors



http://www.hirecontractors.gregvan.com Click on this link to increase your knowledge about hiring contractors with a simplified step-by-step set of instructions. I made this video in direct response to an email I received about problems someone had with their contractor. It is painfully clear to me that some people don't have a clue what they're getting into and this video might provide them with a little more information about what they need to do, before they actually sign a contract.

Friday, July 3, 2015

How to Build a Shed - The Home Depot



Sheds provide needed space for additional storage at your home or business. We asked "ChrisFixIt" from http://community.homedepot.com and Bill from Handy Home to show us what happens when you hire The Home Depot to install a shed. Bill takes us through the steps to assemble a Handy Home Products Majestic 8 foot x 12 foot wood storage shed.

The Home Depot carries a variety of sheds and outdoor storage solutions. We can also install it for you, as shown in this video.

Rather do-it-yourself? "ChrisFixIt" from http://community.homedepot.com explains the process here: http://bit.ly/fDaJF3

Learn more about Home Depot Home Services http://bit.ly/g7cODg

See more: http://thd.co/1a8IezL

Thursday, July 2, 2015

Ladder Safety: Injury Prevention - The Belt Buckle Rule - Safety Training Video




About 150,000 people are treated in hospitals every year for injuries incurred while working with a ladder, and to many of these are fatalities. The overwhelming number of ladder injuries occur at homes, but an accident in the workplace can cause enormous problems, including dealing with traumatized co-workers, OSHA, insurance and workers comp.

Human error is by far the leading cause of ladder accidents. In this short video we discuss the "belt buckle" rule that says a person on a ladder must always keep his or her belt buckle between the uprights in order to prevent accidents and injuries.

Good risk management and cost control measures include training every worker and providing frequent reminders about safety and accident prevention. That is the purpose of this video.

Copy the URL for this and for our other safety videos and have your employees watch them. They are short and to the point, and they make great safety training tools. Some companies send the links out in emails so workers can watch them at home and share them with family members.

We post new safety videos often, so subscribe to our channel and never miss one. Click this link to subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c...

Don't forget to "like" our videos, (or not like them). Either way please let us have your comments.

If you have a safety topic you would like to see in a video, let us know in the comments section and we will do our best to provide it on our channel.

Thanks for watching, and have a safe day!