Monday, September 29, 2014

What to do After Getting the SitePro Inspection Report



A great SitePro Inspection is made up of three components; a snapshot of the building materials and systems in your home, a list of 'deficiencies' from correct or safe building practices, and an education on your homes major systems. The list of 'deficiencies' is often the most concerning to home buyers after a SitePro Inspection as this is what may break a sale or could involve unexpected expenses during the purchase process. So what should home buyers do after they get the SitePro inspection report?

Get All The Information
Everything about a home can be fixed except for its location and no home is perfect under the lens of a SitePro Inspection . Most home 'deficiencies' are related to changes made by amateurs after the home was built, neglected maintenance items, or aging systems needing replacement soon.

Read the SitePro Inspection  report and all the written comments from your SitePro inspector to get the most information from the report. Your SitePro inspector and your SitePro Inspection  report should be able to tell you what your next step is for each deficiency and the degree of urgency a defect has. Some 'deficiencies' are inexpensive to repair but urgent to repair as they may present a life safety hazard (e.g. exposed live wires). Other 'deficiencies' are not immediate life safety hazards but may require budgeting for the repair such as replacing an old hot water tank that is still fully functional at the time of the inspection.

Home sellers are also a great source of information on the home. For example, if the SitePro Inspector notices signs of a past oil heating system, the home seller should be able to identify if an oil tank has been removed from the site. Home sellers also should keep copies of warranties and guarantees on work done on the home. If the SitePro Inspector  identifies an installation defect on a new furnace, this may be repairable under the original warranty.

Talk To Your Realtor
You should have an excellent working relationship with your Realtor if you are going to have a successful real estate transaction. Experienced Realtors have dealt with many of the common home deficiencies found in SitePro Inspections in the past and they can offer solutions to you like:
  • ·         Arrange for the seller/builder to fix a deficiency before possession changes
  • ·         Helping you find a contractor or handy person who can fix the deficiency
  • ·         Arrange for more time before removing purchase subjects to investigate the problem(s)
  • ·         Re-negotiating the purchase price of a home
  • ·         Negotiating a Hold-Back in case of premature system failure or future Strata assessments
  • ·         Help You Decide when to remove inspection subjects

Your Realtor can also help give you guidance if the home deficiencies are beyond normal and reasonable repair and perhaps you should consider walking away from the home and looking for another one. Ultimately this decision is up to the client but your Realtor can help you understand what your options are.

Who Should Fix the Deficiencies?
Many home sellers are quick to suggest they will fix a deficiency rather than take a hold-back,  lower the purchase price, or lose the sale. While this method may solve the problem, the buyer does not have any control over who is fixing the problem and the materials used. As many 'deficiencies' in a SitePro home inspection come from amateur work, the last thing you want is for another amateur to 'fix' the problem. It is also important that all work is performed by licensed trades people and that any permits that may be needed are in place.

On existing homes, SitePro Home Inspectors typically recommend that the home buyer has the correct people come in to fix any deficiencies after the home transaction is complete. This allows the future occupant of the home to know that the repairs are done right and will be safe and solid for years to come. If the home is newly built, the builder and their trades people should correct any deficiencies before the transaction is completed.

Professional SitePro Home Inspectors  operate under standards of ethics which prevent them from quoting on, performing any repair work, or collecting referral fees for recommending any contractors. This is to protect
SitePro home inspection clients who have a lot at stake based on the recommendations of a SitePro home inspection report. If your SitePro home inspector offers to do repairs or have a family member do repairs for a fee, you should throw away the entire inspection as suspect and bring in an independent professional SitePro home inspector for a new inspection.

Call in the Experts
All repairs should always be performed by licensed professionals. For minor fixes, many professionals will perform repairs based on an hourly labor rate plus repair material which they typically will have in their service vehicle. Don't be surprised if there is a minimum charge for showing up. Your Realtor or the Better Business Bureau can help you find a trusted professional if you don't have any personal connections.

If the repair job is beyond a normal service call, it may be necessary to get a few quotes from professionals in your area. Contractor rates can vary by as much as 300% and the quality of labor and materials can vary greatly.


Final Thoughts
As no home is perfect under the lens of a SitePro home inspection, clients will always have to make some decisions about 'deficiencies' found in a SitePro home inspection report and assume some of the risks and maintenance expenses with a home purchase. While in some extreme cases the deficiencies may be severe enough to walk away from a home purchase, most items are fixable for a very small percentage of the purchase price of the home or with just a little maintenance time from the new home buyer.


Van Hibberts, CMI

Certified Residential Building Code Inspector ICC-5319905
Florida-State Certified Master Home Inspector Lic. #HI89
Florida-Certified Wind Mitigation Inspector
203(k) FHA/HUD Consultant #A0900
WDO Certificate #JE190791 
NACHI #10071802
362 Gulf Breeze Parkway, #214
Gulf Breeze, Florida 32561
850.934.6800  (Office)
850.485.3209  (Cell / Text Msg)
"Looking Beyond The Obvious"


Nothing in this message is intended to constitute an electronic signature unless a specific statement to the contrary is included in this message.

DISCLAIMER: The information in this communication is confidential and may be legally privileged. It is intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom it is addressed and other authorized to receive it. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution or taking any action in reliance of the contents of this information is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful. If you have received this message in error, please contact the sender immediately by return e-mail. SitePro LLC is neither liable for the proper nor complete transmission of the information contained in this communication nor for any delay in its receipt.

SitePro Residential and Commericial Inspections has taken every reasonable precaution to ensure that any attachment to this e-mail has been swept for viruses. However, we cannot accept liability for any damage sustained as a result of viruses and would advise that you carry out your own virus check before opening any attachment. This e-mail is meant to communicate company related materials only. Opinions expressed by the author of this e-mail are solely his/her own. SitePro Residential and Commericial Inspections will not be liable for opinions expressed in this e-mail.

Saturday, September 27, 2014

How to Install a Solar-Powered Water Heater - This Old House



Harnessing the sun's power with This Old House plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey and plumbing and heating contractor Bob Dudley. (See below for a shopping list and tools.)

Click here to SUBSCRIBE to the official This Old House YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c...

Full episode: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uJxBE...

How to Install Solar Panels: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=subia...

How to Maintain an Electric Water Heater: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cTPSo...

How to Flush a Water Heater: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PjwEN...

Follow This Old House:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ThisOldHouse
Twitter: https://twitter.com/thisoldhouse
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Instagram: http://instagram.com/thisoldhouse
Tumblr: http://thisoldhouse.tumblr.com/

Thursday, September 25, 2014

Monitor for a Storm Surge as you track a Hurricane

What is a Hurricane Storm Surge?

Storm Surge is a phenomenon that occurs most often when a tropical cyclone, either a tropical storm or a hurricane pushes water onshore. The winds associated with these types of storms are remarkably fast and as they rush across the surface of the water they push the water forward causing it to rise above normal sea level. Also the center of these circular storms, the eye, is a low pressure area compared to the surrounding storm and this causes a second rise in sea lea called a pressure surge.

This creates a front of waves and water that rush towards the shore and can flood and destroy coastal areas. The extent to which your area is going to be in danger depends on the strength of the storm and the topography of the ocean floor around your coastline.

The damage that a hurricane can inflict comes not only from the ferociously high winds but also from flooding and waves caused by these storm surges. Much of the reason that Hurricane Katrina was a deadly and caused as much damage as it did was because of massive flooding. In some coastal cities nearly 80% of the metropolitan areas were completely flooded. In New Orleans waves 15 feet above normal rushed over seawalls to flood the city. In the deadliest and most costly hurricanes in United States history the storm surge associated with the storm is how most lives are lost and the most damage caused.

The threat of a storm surge should be monitored as you track a hurricane in your area. If you are in an area that is considered close to sea level you should monitor your evacuation status. If you are ordered to evacuate proceed immediately to your local hurricane shelter. The storm surge can be just as deadly as the high winds brought on by the hurricanes.

 By

Find out everything that you should know about hurricanes at [http://my-hurricane-guide.info]
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=David_Stone
 

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Your Hurricane Preparedness Checklist - 23 Vital and Easy and Simple Supplies

When a hurricane strikes, the worst thing that can happen is being unprepared. The second worst thing is to waste time gathering the wrong supplies in an attempt to get prepared. Getting ready for Hurricane Season doesn't have to cost ridiculous amounts of money, nor do you need to build a fallout bunker to hide in for years. With the right checklist of essential supplies, you can ride out the storm and its aftermath with less stress and with a strategic advantage. Here is a list of 23 vital items that will help you be well-prepared for a disaster emergency - and it all starts with a relatively inexpensive thick-walled foam cooler.

    Thick Walled Foam Cooler Ice Chest - a superior grade, 1 1/2 to 2 inch thick, fully fused EPS foam cooler will cost so much less than a hard shell plastic or metal cooler that you can buy quite a few of them and come nowhere near the painful expense of hard-surface brands. That means you can have more storage ability and even have some left over for neighbors, friends, or relatives where themselves may wind up in need. The thermal qualities of high-grade foam coolers allow for keeping items cold for days when properly packed, and you'll find that emergency management organizations often neglect to provide disaster area residents with such a simple, fundamental necessity. So, while other people are worrying about what to do with the bags of ice that they collect from FEMA or the Red Cross in the blazing summer heat, you'll be able to take along your light-weight, reliable cooler to protect your cold stuff from the heat.

  •     Batteries - multiple sizes! Someone else may have a radio or other info-gathering device if yours breaks.
  •     Water - bottled or in plastic jugs. Some can keep in the foam cooler, while the rest can be stored somewhere in the shade to prevent your water stash from getting too hot.
  •     Charcoal - useful for grilling and cooking even without a charcoal grill.
  •     Mosquito Repellant - there's no need to suffer when swarms kick up due to stagnant water sources that result from deluges of rain.
  •     First Aid Supplies - if some of those supplies are temperature sensitive, use the foam coolers to keep them protected from the heat.
  •     Food - canned and non-perishable. Once a can of food is opened or prepared, leftovers can go in the thermal-insulated foam cooler.
  •     Disposable plates, cups, utensils
  •     Baby Needs - formula, diapers, and other necessities. Use the foam cooler to keep formula and baby food cool.
  •     Spare Clothes - protected in plastic or another waterproof method.
  •     Prescription Medications - consult a pharmacist to learn what temperature ranges are best for a particular type of medicine.
  •     Pet Medications - consult the veterinarian to learn what temperature ranges are best for a particular type of pet medicine.
  •     Plastic Garbage Bags - thick ones, large. Definitely come in handy.
  •     Cleaning Supplies - storm damage can be messy, even unsanitary.
  •     Children's Toys - to keep the young ones occupied and entertained.
  •     Pet Food - dry food will last longer than canned wet foods.
  •     Ice - bagged, can be kept in freezer until transferred for use in foam cooler.
  •     Candles - lots of them, without dye colorings that can cause irritating smoke.
  •     Canned Drinks - non-soda is better for the body - healthy fruit juices and such.
  •     Sterno - for cooking.
  •     Propane - serves for cooking, and in some cases for heating.
  •     Bleach - both for cleaning and appropriate disinfectant purposes.
  •     Dish Detergent - will clean well and still good enough for washing clothing.
When it comes to making yourself ready for a strong tropical storm or hurricane, having a well-made foam cooler ice chest is an essential focal point to ensure that you can more easily bear the brunt of the aftermath when the power is out and you need to keep items protected from the heat of the sun. The low cost, reliability, and even the fact that they make great flotation make the decision to purchase at least one a very practical idea.

My name is Riley Marquette and I'm a content provider for http://www.loboy.com and The Bear Facts (Lifestyle) Blog. I'm an admitted, unabashed, stark raving fan of LoBoy Foam Coolers and Insul-Pak Insulated Foam Shippers and other related Magna Manufacturing, Inc. products. It's not about the cooler - it's about the FUN YOU HAVE WITH THE COOLER!


By Riley Marquette
Expert Author Riley Marquette
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Riley_Marquette

Sunday, September 21, 2014

Turning Your Smartphone Into a Weather Radio



Mark Taylor from Weather Decision Technologies (WDT) explains the power of the FLASH Weather Alerts smartphone app and how it can keep you and your family alert during a tornado warning.

Friday, September 19, 2014

How To Strengthen Your Home for Under $10,000 – Roof, Walls, Windows, and Doors



Ed Laatsch from FEMA explains how to strengthen your home with for under $10,000 by protecting the openings in your home.

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Firewise Virtual Workshop: Get Prepared, Stay Alive, Rebuild Your Life



September is National Preparedness Month and this year’s theme is Be Disaster Aware, Take Action to Prepare.  Join Firewise Communities/USA® residents and wildfire stakeholders in an hour-long preparedness workshop September 16, with author Linda Masterson, as she shares her experience of losing her home in a 2011 wildfire.

What she learned as she navigated through the evacuation, recovery and rebuilding stages is something all residents living with a wildfire risk need to know.  She shares the importance of being prepared long before the fire happens and explains how to accomplish it. Masterson’s real-life experience will motivate residents to embrace mitigation and proactively implement actions during Preparedness Month. 

Monday, September 15, 2014

How to Install a Tile Backsplash - The Home Depot





This video demonstrates the installation of natural stone mosaic tile. We use a traditional powdered thinset mortar, called FlexBond, which is recommended for bonding porcelain, ceramic, mosaic tiles and natural stones.

 Find more information and the materials needed for this project here: http://thd.co/XXl0uG

Find backsplash options from The Home Depot here: http://thd.co/Vga5ub

Saturday, September 13, 2014

How to Replace a Window Sash Spring Balancer - This Old House



This Old House general contractor Tom Silva repairs a window that won't stay open. (See below for a shopping list and tools.)

Click here to SUBSCRIBE to the official This Old House YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c...

How to Repair Stuck Sash Windows: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jsgiv...

How to Replace The Sash Lock on a Vinyl Window: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4lDnj...

How to Replace a Rotted Windowsill: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x8iu9...

Shopping List for Replacing a Window Sash Spring Balancer:
- spring balancers

Tools for Replacing a Window Sash Spring Balancer
- pliers
- drill/driver

Follow This Old House:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ThisOldHouse
Twitter: https://twitter.com/thisoldhouse
Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/thisoldhouse/
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Instagram: http://instagram.com/thisoldhouse
Tumblr: http://thisoldhouse.tumblr.com/

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Why Choose Laminate Flooring? - The Home Depot



Find laminate flooring options from The Home Depot here: http://thd.co/1vyXIKq
Understand the features and benefits of laminate flooring from one of our associates.

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

How to Patch a Leaking Rubber Roof - This Old House



This Old House general contractor Tom Silva repairs a leaking flat roof with a new, long-lasting patch. (See below for a shopping list and tools.)

Shopping List for How to Patch a Leaking Rubber Roof:
- high-density fiberboard, forms new substrate under roofing
- rubber roofing
- rubber membrane cleaner
- rubber-to-rubber contact cement
- lap sealant

Tools for How to Patch a Leaking Rubber Roof:
- utility knife
- drill/driver
- framing square
- 3-inch paintbrush
- 3-inch roller
- caulk gun

Sunday, September 7, 2014

SitePro – Service AFTER the Home Purchase!



Don't hesitate to call on us if we can answer any property related questions for you in the future.


RESPONSE EMAIL FROM CUSTOMER:

From: darkdoraemon@aol.com [mailto:darkdoraemon@aol.com]
Sent: Friday, September 5, 2014 10:33 AM
To: van@sitepro.us
Subject: Re: Your inspection at 159 Shoreline Drive, Mary Esther, FL 32569

I can’t thank you enough for saving us over 50K on the house that flooded. We love our new home and if we ever need another inspection we will use you. We will also recommend you to friends.
Thank you
Juan Newman


ORIGINAL EMAIL FROM SITEPRO:

RE: Your inspection at 159 Shoreline Dr, Mary Esther, FL 32569

Hello Juan Newman

Now that you hopefully have caught your breath and started to settle in, the inspection probably seemed like it happened a long time ago. Our goal was to make it an informative and helpful experience and please don't hesitate to call on us if we can answer any property related questions for you in the future. We want to be your 'home inspector for life'.

We strive to inspect every property as if it were our own. If you have family, friends or colleagues looking to buy or sell we hope you will feel comfortable passing our name along.

Endorsements from our satisfied clients is our highest measure of success.

Thank you for choosing SitePro Residential and Commercial Inspections. 

Sincerely,
Van Hibberts
SitePro Residential and Commercial Inspections
(850) 934-6800
http://sitepro.us 
Van Hibberts, CMI

Certified Residential Building Code Inspector ICC-5319905
IBHS Fortified  Certified Inspector  #FEV32561020109 
ARA Certified Inspector #20302 (Applied Research Associates)
Florida-State Certified Master Inspector Lic. #HI 89
Certified Owens-Corning Roof Data Inspector
Florida-Certified Wind Mitigation Inspector
WDO Certificate #JE190791 
InterNACHI #10071802
362 Gulf Breeze Parkway, #214
Gulf Breeze, Florida 32561
850.934.6800  (Office)                                          
850.485.3209  (Cell / Text Msg)    

"Looking Beyond The Obvious"


Nothing in this message is intended to constitute an electronic signature unless a specific statement to the contrary is included in this message.

DISCLAIMER: The information in this communication is confidential and may be legally privileged. It is intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom it is addressed and other authorized to receive it. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution or taking any action in reliance of the contents of this information is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful. If you have received this message in error, please contact the sender immediately by return e-mail. SitePro LLC is neither liable for the proper nor complete transmission of the information contained in this communication nor for any delay in its receipt.

SitePro Residential and Commercial Inspections has taken every reasonable precaution to ensure that any attachment to this e-mail has been swept for viruses. However, we cannot accept liability for any damage sustained as a result of viruses and would advise that you carry out your own virus check before opening any attachment. This e-mail is meant to communicate company related materials only. Opinions expressed by the author of this e-mail are solely his/her own. SitePro Residential and Commericial Inspections will not be liable for opinions expressed in this e-mail.

Friday, September 5, 2014

How to Fix a Noisy Faucet - This Old House




This Old House plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey quiets a tap that's making a hammering sound. (See below for a shopping list and tools.)

Click here to SUBSCRIBE to the official This Old House YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_c...

Full episode: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rZqiS...

How to Repair a Leaking Faucet: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zMH61...

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

How to make a Kitchen - The Pantry



The pantry is perhaps the hardest working unit in any kitchen. A good plan, a review of how it might be used by the family, and some hard work on the design are essential to creating a good storage space.

Read more at: http://bit.ly/1mieR6Z

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Disaster Resistant Landscaping



Homeowners are shown effective ways to landscape their homes to resist disasters such as wildfire and high wind events.