Monday, June 30, 2014

Pallet Rack For Organizing Your Shop Area


Does your shop area or storage area look a bit unorganized? Does your shop area need some type of shelving that is going to allow you to take advantage of the space you really have above your head? Pallet racks are going to allow you to stack up the items that you store for store use or for sale. Pallet racks are stackable types of storage systems that are going to allow you to see what you have in storage, while walking along the floor. If you have a storage rack that is not more than ten feet high, and your storage space ceiling is about thirty feet high, you have a lot of under used space, and pallet racks are going to allow you the added luxury of using this space.

The space above your head can be organized with pallet racks. You do not have to be storing all types of heavy equipment or large boxes, you could be storing statues, or boxes of clothing, pictures or even evidence used for cases that are being tried in the past. Pallet racks are a method of organized anything, from the lightest mattress to the heavy air conditioners, or even bed rails for trucks.

How can you use pallet racks in your shop area or in your shop storage area?
A pallet rack is going to put your storage up in the air, and you will need access to get to these items. If you are storing items that are heavy you will need some type of machinery to get it back down when needed without having to worry about it dropping to the floor and damaging the item. Think about the machinery that will be kept inside all the time, it is going to last a long time, years into the future of your business, so it will be worth the investment.

For the pallet rack that will store small boxes full of items, or toys, clothing or even areas that are rented out for personal storage, you can use a rolling stepladder to get the items down. Some of these rolling step ladders are going to be hooked directly to the pallet rack, while others are going to be free standing sturdy types of ladders that you can move about anywhere in the storage area of your warehouse.

Pallet racks can be ordered online. To do this, first measure the area that you are going to install the pallet racks in. Now that you know how much space you have to work with, you are one step ahead when looking at the types of pallet racks that can be installed in your storage area. Some pallet rack companies will come to your area, and install the pallet racks, welding and building the racks to your specifications. Other companies will provide you with the needed materials and the instructions on how to install the pallet racks yourself. Eight ways you will find that your pallet racks are going to organize your space, and will give you a method of seeing exactly what you have on hand when you walk through storage!

By author Morten Flatner,

Please also visit
[http://www.bathroomfixture.biz] and [http://www.cleanser-colon.org/]

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Morten_Flatner

Saturday, June 28, 2014

Several Tips For Choosing A Moving Company



Most people don't mind moving to a new home. It is the actual process of moving that they don't like. Having to box up their possessions, choose a moving company, and get settled into the new place is a process that very few people enjoy. To assist you in getting at least one of those tasks completed without too much trouble, here are some tips of choosing moving company.

The best way to start your search is to talk to friends and family members about what they did when they moved to their new home. They can tell you about their experience with various companies and give you a general idea of who is good and who you want to avoid. Try to get the names of at least three different businesses so you have a good group to choose from.

Before calling around for information, you will want to do some planning. You want to determine exactly what you need the company to handle for you and what you will be taking care of on your own. For example, you may only need the movers to port your furniture to your new house and you will move the smaller items. How much you have moved will affect the price so you don't want to skip this step.

When you have yourself sufficiently organized contact the companies. You are not calling to get an estimate. Your purpose for calling is to get information about how they do business. Find out how long they have been conducting moves, the type of equipment they use, and if they are a member of the American Moving and Storage Association which provides some assurance they are a good company.

Interviewing them over the phone should give you a good feel for the company. When you have spoken to a few that you feel comfortable with, schedule an appointment for them to look at your stuff. It is important that you relay all the pertinent information regarding your move to the company's representative as those details can affect the price. For example, if they have to park a ways from the home they may charge more because it will take longer to move your stuff into your home.

Generally, your experience with the customer service representative will determine what it will be like to work with the movers. Therefore, take the opportunity to ask more questions such as whether they will insure your belongings and who you would need to talk to if you had problems or complaints. Make note of their answers so you can compare them to the other companies you contacted.

After the evaluation you will be presented with an estimate for your move. It may be tempting to go with the lowest price especially if you are strapped for cash. However, it is true what they say. You do get what you pay for. Choose a mover based on the quality of service they provide. If they happen to have the lowest bid then that is a bonus for you.

Double check your choice by visiting the Better Business Bureau website to see what their rating is. Avoid companies that have poor ratings. Picking a good company to help you move can be a challenge. Use these tips of choosing moving company to make the process a little easier.

Browse websites for more information before choosing a Movers BC company. Full service, a  Vancouver Moving Company providing residential and office moving, boxes, and storage facilities.

By Adriana A Noton 
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Adriana_A_Noton

Thursday, June 26, 2014

Maintenance of Your Roof-Covering

Preserve your investment—and keep your family safe and healthy—by maintaining your home using the following tips.



Although homeowners aren’t necessarily expected to climb on their roofs every season as part of regular home maintenance, there are some conditions that should be monitored to prevent roof damage and to help you get the longest life out of your roof-covering materials.  Certain types of damage can lead to water and pest intrusion, structural deterioration, and the escape costly energy.

Weathering
Hail and storm damage, known as weathering, can weaken a roof’s surface even if you haven’t lost any shingles/shakes/slates following a storm.  It’s the most common source of environmental damage for roofs.  Strong, sustained winds can cause uplift to the edges of shingles and shakes, which can weaken their points of attachment and allow rainwater and melting snow to reach the roof’s underlayment.  Wind can also send projectiles through the air, which can damage every surface of the home’s exterior, including the roof.  You should always inspect your roof after a heavy weather event, as far as it is practical to do so without taking any undue risks, to check whether you have lost any roof-covering materials, or if any parts look particularly weathered or damaged.  A small fix now could prevent costly repairs later.

Tree Damage
Tree damage results from wind-blown tree branches scraping against shingles and from the impact of falling branches blown by wind and/or because the nearby tree has dead branches that eventually break off and fall.  Branches that overhang the roof should always be cut back to avoid damage from both abrasion and impact, and to prevent the accumulation of leaf debris on the roof, its valleys, and in the gutters, which will interfere with proper drainage and lead to pooling of rainwater and snowmelt.  Of course, it’s especially important to make sure that tree limbs near the home’s roof and exterior are a safe distance away from utility and power lines.  Tree-trimming is a type of homeowner maintenance task should be undertaken by qualified professionals, as it can lead to accidentally cutting off the service or power from an overhead line, being electrocuted by an energized line, being struck by an unsecured tree branch, falling off the roof or a ladder, and any number of similar mishaps that the homeowner is not trained to anticipate and avoid.

Animal Damage
Squirrels and raccoons (and roof rats in coastal regions) will sometimes tear through shingles and roof sheathing when they’re searching for a protected area in which to build nests and raise their young. They often attack the roof’s eaves first, especially on homes that have suffered decay to the roof sheathing due to a lack of drip edges or from problems caused by ice damming, because decayed sheathing is softer and easier to tear through.  If you hear any activity of wildlife on your roof, check inside your attic for evidence of pest intrusion, such as damaged insulation, which pests may use for nesting material.  Darkened insulation generally indicates that excess air is blowing through some hole in the structure, leading the insulation to become darkened by dirt or moisture.

Biological Growth
Algae, moss and lichen are types of biological growth that may be found on asphalt shingles under certain conditions. Some professionals consider this growth destructive, while others consider it merely a cosmetic problem.  Asphalt shingles may become discolored by both algae and moss, which spread by releasing airborne spores.

Almost all biological growth on shingles is related to the long-term presence of excess moisture, which is why these problems are more common in areas with significant rainfall and high relative humidity.  But even in dry climates, roofs that are shaded most of the time can develop biological growth.

What we commonly call “algae” is actually not algae, but a type of bacteria capable of photosynthesis. Algae appears as dark streaks, which are actually the dark sheaths produced by the organisms to protect themselves from the ultraviolet radiation of the sun. When environmental conditions are right, the problem can spread quickly across a roof.

Algae can feed on mineral nutrients, such as the calcium carbonate in limestone used as asphalt shingle filler. Calcium carbonate also causes asphalt to retain moisture, which also promotes algae growth, so shingles with excessive filler may be more likely to suffer more algae growth.  The rate of filler consumption is slow enough that it’s not generally considered a serious problem.

Algae attach to the shingle by secreting a substance that bonds it tightly to the surface. Growth can be difficult to remove without damaging the roof. The best method is prevention. Algae stains can sometimes be lightened in color by using special cleaners.  Power-washing and heavy scrubbing may loosen or dislodge granules. Chemicals used for cleaning shingles may damage landscaping. Also, the cleaning process makes the roof wet and slippery, so such work should be performed by a qualified professional.

Moss is a greenish plant that can grow more thickly than algae. It attaches itself to the roof through a shallow root system that can be freed from shingles fairly easily with a brush.  Moss deteriorates shingles by holding moisture against them, but this is a slow process. Moss is mostly a cosmetic issue and, like algae, can create hazardous conditions for those who climb on the roof.

Lichens are composite organisms consisting of a fungus and a photosynthetic partner, such as green or blue-green algae. Lichens bond tightly to the roof, and when they’re removed from asphalt shingles, they may take granules with them. Damage from lichen removal can resemble blistering.

"Tobacco-juicing" is the brownish discoloration that appears on the surface of shingles, under certain weather conditions. It’s often temporary and may have a couple of different causes. After especially long periods of intensely sunny days, damp nights and no rain, water-soluble compounds may leach out of the asphalt from the shingles and be deposited on the surface.  Tobacco-juicing may also appear under the same weather conditions if the air is especially polluted.  Tobacco-juicing won’t harm asphalt shingles, although it may run down the roof and stain siding. Although it’s more common in the West and Southwest, it can happen anywhere that weather conditions are right.  You can spray-wash or paint the exterior of the home to remove tobacco-juicing.

Roof Penetrations:

Homeowners don’t generally want to climb on their roofs to check its condition unless they’ve experienced a major storm or other issue that prompts them to investigate.  This is smart because, as untrained non-professionals, homeowners are at greater risk for accidents and injuries than pros.

But it’s useful for homeowners to know what they’re likely to find if they do climb their roof—or have someone else climb it, such as an insurance adjuster or roofing contractor—so that they have some idea of what the components are and what they do, as well as when those components are damaged and creating problems down below.

The proper term for anything that pokes out of the surface of the roof is known as a roof penetration.  Whether it’s a chimney, skylight or vent pipe, it falls under that category.  As such, there are important elements related to the installation of all roof penetrations that prevent their premature deterioration, which means that your roof and the structure under it will stay dry and problem-free.

Vents
The most common type of roof penetration are vents. Every home has them. Vents are installed to expel gas or moisture of some sort from an appliance or area inside the house.  Vents are also called flues.

Here are the most common types and their functions:
  •     Exhaust vents or mechanical ventilation allow the escape of damp air and odors from a bathroom, clothes dryer, and from the range above a stove in order to prevent the buildup of condensation.
  •     Each plumbing drainpipe in the home is connected to a plumbing stack vent, which helps ensure the appliance’s proper drainage by preventing back-siphoning, which can pull noxious vapors and sewer gases back into the home.  One important aspect of their installation is that they should not be located with 3 feet of an openable window so that these gases don’t get sucked back into the home.
  •     Vents installed in the attic space are known as roof vents or turtle vents, which release hot air that can build up inside the attic as a result of heat rising from the living space below.  Venting this hot air is important to prevent the premature deterioration of the roofing materials, which can overheat and lose adhesion or delaminate, as well as form condensation, under the right conditions, which can also affect wooden structural members and insulation.
  •     Combustion vents are installed for fuel-burning appliances, such as a furnace, boiler, water heater, gas range, fireplace—any appliance that burns fuel for its operation, such as gas, propane, oil, wood, etc. They exhaust the toxic byproducts of combustion to the outdoors.
Vents can be made of galvanized steel, such as a dryer vent.  PVC is appropriate to use as plumbing stack vents, depending on the appliance, as long as there is no chance of the exhausted air being too warm, which can cause the PVC to melt. Some vents may have caps or hoods to prevent rainwater from entering them (such as a dryer vent), and others don’t, such as plumbing stacks. There are also vent-like roof penetrations that are actually air intakes, such as for a furnace, which aid proper combustion. 

Vents can be double-walled or single-wall, depending on their purpose.  Combustion vents tend to be double-walled.  Some vents serve multiple items or appliances, but they tend to be of the same type.  A vent that serves more than one plumbing fixture needs to be larger in order to move the gas at an appropriate rate.

Problems with Combustion Vents
If installed properly, vents tend to operate problem-free, but poor installation or materials can lead to issues, such as leaks, corrosion, and insufficient ventilation.  That’s when the problems can affect the living space and appliances below.  The most common issues occur with combustion vents.

To work effectively, a combustion vent has to draw adequately, which is the natural process that moves hot exhaust gases up and out the exhaust flue or vent. Another way to say it is that the vent needs to have a good draft. The effectiveness of the draft is influenced by several factors.

These factors include:
  •     thermal buoyancy, which is the tendency of hot air to rise. The hotter the gas is, the faster it will rise;
  •     unrestricted flow, which means that the exhaust flue can’t be too small or have too many bends, since these two things slow the flow; and
  •     proper length. If a flue is too long, the gases will cool and condensation will form. Condensation can cause corrosion of the sheet metal exhaust flue, as well as the furnace’s components.
An important factor in the quality of the draft is adequate clearance above the roof.  This generally means that the vent should follow either the manufacturer’s installation recommendations or the "2-10 Rule" required by most building code regulations for chimney terminations.  The 2-10 Rule states that combustion vents should terminate at least 2 feet above any part of the highest part of the roof, including the roof itself, within 10 feet.  For example, if a combustion vent is 3 feet away from a dryer vent on a flat roof, the combustion vent should be two feet higher than the dryer vent.  If a combustion vent is on the low part of a sloping roof, the vent must be 2 feet higher than the nearest point of the sloped roof that’s within 10 feet.  So, if you see a vent that doesn’t meet the 2-10 Rule, a qualified HVAC contractor may need to re-install a vent of the proper height.

White deposits on combustion vents or on the roof below them are evidence that excessive condensation has been forming. This can be caused by a vent that:
  •     is too long;
  •     has too many bends; or
  •     has poorly sloped sections that slow the flow of exhaust gases.
If you see this condition on a roof, you should look for similar white deposits on the combustion appliance served by the vent. Poor venting can cause corrosion that may shorten the lifespan of that appliance.

Flashing for Vents
The critical installation that keeps moisture and the elements from entering the roof surface down the side of the vent is called flashing.  Different types of vents require flashing that is appropriate for the type of vent installation, as well as of a compatible material so that it doesn’t cause galvanic corrosion or other issues that will cause the vent or flashing to deteriorate prematurely.  Flashing may need to be on top of roof shingles or below stone tiles; a good roofing contractor who specializes in your roof’s material will know what type of flashing is required and how it should be installed.

Of course, a leak in the attic, or any signs of rust or staining on the vent, flashing or roof is a sign of a problem.  If you do suspect a problem, your first call should be to your home inspector so that he can investigate it before you call a contractor.  Most contractors are honest, but since the contractor has something to sell, and it’s in his best interests to find a problem that he can charge you to fix.  Call your SitePro home inspector first; it’s his job to find the problem, not fix it.

Attic Insulation
Heating and cooling costs can be slashed by up to 30% per year by properly sealing and insulating the home. Insulating the attic should be a top priority for preventing heat loss because as heat rises, a critical amount of heat loss from the living areas of the home occurs through an unfinished attic.  During the summer months, heat trapped in the attic can reduce the home’s ability to keep cool, forcing the home's cooling system to work overtime.

The lack of adequate ventilation in insulated attics is a common problem.  Ensuring that there is a free flow of outside air from the soffits to the roof vents is key to a well-functioning insulation system. Look behind the baffles to see if there is any misplaced insulation obstructing the natural air flow, and check the roof vents to make sure that outside air is exhausting properly. Also, look for spots where the insulation is compacted; it may need to be fluffed out.  If loose-fill insulation is installed, check for any thinly spread areas that may need topping up. Finally, look for dark spots in the insulation where incoming air is admitting wind-blown dust and moisture into the material.  Any unintended openings or holes caused by weathering or pest damage should be repaired first.

Installing Attic Insulation
The objective in an attic insulation project is to insulate the living space of the house while allowing the roof to retain the same temperature as the outdoors. This prevents cold outside air from traveling through the attic and into the living area of the home. In order to accomplish this, an adequate venting system must be in place to vent the roof by allowing air flow to enter through soffit-intake vents and out through ridge vents, gable vents or louver vents.

If there is currently a floor in the attic, it will be necessary to pull up pieces of the floor to install the insulation. In this case, it will be easier to use a blower and loose-fill insulation to effectively fill the spaces between the joists. If you choose to go with blown-in insulation, you can usually get free use of a blower when you purchase a certain amount of insulation.
 
When installing fiberglass insulation, make sure that you wear personal protective equipment, including a hat, gloves, goggles and a face mask, as stray fiberglass material can become airborne, which can cause irritation to the lungs, eyes and exposed skin.

Before you begin actually installing the insulation, there is some important preparation involved in order to ensure that the insulation is applied properly to prevent hazards and to achieve maximum effectiveness.

Step 1: Install Roof Baffles
In order to maintain the free flow of outside air, it is recommended that polystyrene or plastic roof baffles are installed where the joists meet the rafters. These can be stapled into place.

Step 2: Place Baffles Around Electrical Fixtures
Next, place baffles around any electrical fixtures (lights, electrical receptacles, etc.), since these may become hot while in use. Hold the baffles in place by cross-sectioning the rafters with 2x4s placed at a 3-inch clearance around the fixture.  Cut the polystyrene board to fit around the fixture and inside the wood square you have just created.

Step 3: Install a Vapor Barrier
If you are installing insulation with a vapor barrier, make sure it faces the interior of the house. Another option for a vapor barrier is to take sheets of plastic and lay them between the ceiling joists.  Then, using a staple gun, tack them to the sides of the joists.

Step 4:  Apply the Insulation
Begin by cutting long strips of fiberglass to measure, and lay them in between the joists. Do not bunch or compress the material; this will reduce the insulative effect.
If you’re not planning to put in an attic floor, a second layer of insulation may be laid at a 90-degree angle to the first layer. Do not lay in a second moisture barrier, as moisture could potentially be trapped between the two layers. This second layer of insulation will make it easier to obtain the recommended R-value. In colder climates, an R-value of 49 is recommended for adequate attic insulation. In warmer climates, an R-value of 30 is recommended. Fiberglass insulation has an R-value of roughly R-3 per inch of thickness; cellulose has an R-value of roughly R-4 per inch, but it doesn't retain its R-value rating as well as fiberglass.

If an attic floor is in place, it will be easier to use a blower to add cellulose insulation into the spaces. The best way to achieve this is to carefully select pieces of the floor and remove them in a manner such that you will have access to all of the spaces in between the joists. Run the blower hose up into the attic. A helper may be needed to control the blower. Blow the insulation into the spaces between the joists, taking care not to blow insulation near electrical fixtures. Replace any flooring pieces that were removed.

Loose-fill insulation, either fiberglass or cellulose, is also a good option in cases where there is no attic floor. In such circumstances, you won’t need a blower; you can simply place the insulation between the joists by hand. You may also wish to even out the spread with a notched leveler.
Attic Access Pull-Down Stairs

An attic pull-down ladder, also called an attic pull-down stairway or stairs, is a collapsible ladder that’s permanently attached to the attic floor.  It’s used to access the attic without being required to use a portable ladder, which can be unstable, as well as inconvenient.

Common Defects
It’s typical for the homeowner, rather than the professional builder, to install the attic pull-down stairs, especially if it’s an older home or a newer home that’s been built upward in order to use the attic for living or storage space. That’s why these stairs rarely meet safety standards and are prone to a number of defects.

Some of the more common defective conditions include:
  •     cut bottom cord of structural truss.  The homeowner may have cut through a structural member while installing a pull-down ladder, unknowingly weakening the structure. Structural members should not be modified without an engineer’s approval;
  •     fastened with improper nails or screws. Drywall or deck screws may be used instead of the standard 16d penny nails or ¼x3-inch lag screws. Nails and screws that are intended for other purposes may have reduced shear strength and may not support the pull-down ladder;
  •     fastened with an insufficient number of nails or screws. Manufacturers provide a certain number of nails with instructions that they all be used, and they do this for a good reason;
  •     lack of insulation. The attic hatch or door is not likely to be weather-stripped and/or insulated, which will allow air from the attic to flow freely into the living space of the home, and this will cause the heating or cooling system to run overtime. An attic hatch cover box can be installed to increase energy savings;
  •     loose mounting bolts, which is typically caused by age, although improper installation will hasten the loosening process;
  •     attic pull-down ladders that are cut too short. The stairs should reach the floor;
  •     attic pull-down ladders that are cut too long. This causes pressure at the folding hinge, which can cause breakage;
  •     improper or missing fasteners;
  •     compromised fire barrier (when the attic and access are above an attached garage);
  •     attic ladder frame that is not properly secured to the ceiling opening; and
  •     closed ladder that is covered with debris, such as blown insulation or roofing material shed during roof work; a
  •     cracked steps. This defect is a problem with wooden ladders.
Safety Tips:
  •     If yours is a sliding pull-down ladder, there is a potential for it to slide down too quickly, which can lead to an injury. Always pull the ladder down slowly and cautiously.
  •     Do not allow children to enter the attic unattended. The lanyard attached to the attic stairs should be short enough that children cannot reach it. Parents can also lock the attic ladder so that a key or combination is required to access it.
  •     If possible, avoid carrying large loads into the attic. While a properly installed stairway will safely support an adult, it might fail if you’re carrying a very heavy load. Many trips can be made to reduce the total weight load, if possible.
  •     Replace an old, rickety wooden ladder with a new one. The newer aluminum models are lightweight, sturdy and easy to install.  If you do install a new ladder, follow the manufacturer’s instructions to the letter, and test the ladder’s operation before actually using it.
SitePro Residential and Commercial Inspections

Van Hibberts, CMI
Site Pro Home Inspections

http://siteprohomeinspections.blogspot.com/

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Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Some Recommended Natural Pest Control Techniques


Many people are interested to use natural pest control techniques. This is reasonable because these natural techniques are very safe for themselves. These natural pest solutions do not have dangerous chemical substances that can be harmful for the human body. In this article, you can read some useful natural techniques that you can use to get rid of some pests inside your house. These techniques are chosen because they are very effective to remove pests from your house quickly. Here are some recommended natural pest control techniques that you can follow easily.

a. Steam technology

This is one of the most effective pest control techniques for all homeowners. This technology is very safe for most people. It does not contain dangerous chemical substances. Most experts believe that steam technology is better than the traditional pesticides. Most pests are very sensitive to the hot steam produced by this technology. It means that you can kill these pests easily when you apply hot steam inside your house. If you want to kill insects, rodents, bees, and some other common pests, you may be able to use steam technology to remove these pests.

b. Organic pesticide

You can also find some high quality organic pesticides on the market. These organic products are very recommended for all homeowners who want to avoid any negative side effects from the regular pesticides. These organic products are chosen because they are safe for you, your family, and the environment. Many pests can be killed effectively when you use organic pesticides. However, you have to be very careful when choosing the right organic products as your pesticide. Not all products are made from pure natural ingredients. You have to read the ingredients of these organic pesticides before purchasing these products.

c. Clean your house regularly

This is another effective natural way that you can use to remove pests from your house quickly. Most pests, such as rodents, bees, insects, bed bugs, and many other dangerous pests, usually love dirty places. By cleaning your house regularly, you can remove these pests from your own house effectively. It is recommended that you clean your house at least once in a week. This regular cleaning procedure is very useful to help you get rid of all unwanted pests from your house.

They are some useful tips on how you can remove pests from your house. Pests should be controlled properly, so they are not able to cause any health problems. Some pests can be dangerous because they bring some microorganisms that can cause health problems in your body.

If you want to learn more about the best natural pest solutions, you should read this article. There are many great tips on how you can remove pests naturally from this website.

By Expert Author Krisanto Lin
Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Krisanto_Lin

Sunday, June 22, 2014

10 Tips to Designing and Building the Ultimate Man Cave

Don't know where to get started on your man cave?

1. Take some time to walk through the space and visualize what you want your Man Cave to look like. Be realistic in your assessment of the space and function.

2. Pick an object (pool table, jukebox, picture) that you like and will make part of the room as your inspiration in choosing the overall look and color of your man cave.

3. Measure your space (length, width, height) and transfer these measurements to graph paper using a 1/4" or 1/2" scale. Use it to plan your man cave in detail. The more details you work out on paper, the easier the task of building will be.

4. Make a list of all the materials you will need to accomplish the build. If you’re working with a budget, make sure to leave yourself a 10-15% allowance for miscellaneous or unforeseen costs. There will be some!

5. Make a list of all the tools you will need. Whatever you don’t have you can either borrow from friends and family or rent from your local home improvement store.

6. If your build requires plumbing, electrical or HVAC work, contact licensed professionals for their input or services. Don’t tackle something you’re not comfortable with. If you hire a contractor, get a signed quote from that contractor for the work to be done.

7. Before you start your build, make a step-by step list of what needs to be done in order. Schedule these plans with your contractor.

8. Ask friends and family to help with the build. Try to get people with some building skills so that they might help you direct your plan of attack.

9. Set goals for yourself and your team to accomplish each step of the build in a given time frame.

10. If you hit a wall (figuratively speaking) and have a question about any aspect of your build, I suggest you do two things? go to DIYnetwork.com and watch Man Caves for answers.

Get tips from Jason and the Goose.
Jason Cameron is experienced in carpentry and home remodeling, as well as being an outdoorsman and sportsman.

From http://www.diynetwork.com/home-improvement/

Friday, June 20, 2014

Hurricane Season Preparedness

Hurricane season has started, which means it is important to make sure you are prepared. Below are some helpful tips for hurricane preparedness:
  •     Stocking supplies now by picking up an extra non-perishable food item each week when grocery shopping.
  •     Reviewing your insurance policies to make sure your needs are still being met and premiums are up-to-date.
  •     Ensuring copies of important papers such as insurance policies, birth certificates, and other documentation are kept in a waterproof bag in a secure location such as a safe deposit box or home safe.
  •     Performing routine home maintenance. For example, home shutters can be checked for proper anchors, screws, panels, and other maintenance.
  •     Talking to those close to you about personal safety and communication plans.
  •     Recognizing vulnerabilities and make sure you have considered that in your plans. This may include family, children, pets and the elderly.
Remember, regardless of how severe the season is predicted to be, it only takes one storm to turn your life upside down.

Valuable planning tools and checklists can be found at: www.floridadisaster.org/family.

From http://www.floridasturnpike.com/

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

5 Things to Know Before You Rent Out Your Home



If you’ve entertained thoughts about renting out your home, there may be a few questions you’ve already asked yourself, such as, “Is it worth hanging on to this property? How will I feel about strangers moving into my home? Will my tenants be responsible?”

Owning a rental property can require hard work, patience, and planning.  On one hand, there’s the good to consider, like the potential to increase your income and build a steady cash flow. On the other hand, being a landlord may test your ability to deal with the unexpected, like emergency home repairs or unreliable renters.

Before you hand over the keys to your home, here’s what you can do to make the rental process go smoother.

  •     Research your market. Research the market in the neighborhood of your rental home to choose a rent amount that matches the local rental rates while still helping you earn a profit. Consider the number of bedrooms, bathrooms and square footage. You might also take into consideration any new additions to the property and the age of the home. Don’t forget to factor in costs like pest control, lawn maintenance, and occasional home repairs.
  •     Grace your home with curb appeal. Depending on where you live and the time of year, your home may have taken a beating from the sun, wind, rain, or snow.Without costing an arm and a leg, a power washer can work wonders on your home to give it a fresh look. Clean out the flower beds and trim shrubs and low-hanging tree branches. Giving your lawn a fresh trim, your panels a new coat of paint, or your shutters a good cleaning are all good components of curb appeal. The first impression of your home’s curb appeal can mean everything.
  •     Check to see if your prospective tenant is financially responsible.  A credit check can offer insights into your applicant’s payment history and gives you a good idea if they’ll likely be a good or bad credit risk. You may also want to consider hiring a reputable company that can perform a tenant screening check on your potential occupants to find out if they’ve damaged previous rental properties or have a criminal record. You can also ask for referrals of past residences since this information won’t be included in a credit report.
  •     Plan for financial emergencies. Renting comes with its own set of unexpected emergencies. These emergencies can range from tenants suddenly vacating a property to calling you on a Sunday about a potential water heater replacement. These can be tough expenses to bear, and as a landlord, it will behoove you to keep aside funds for such situations.
  •     Get appropriate insurance coverage. When renting your home to someone, there’s always the possibility that they, or one of their guests, might have an accident or damage your property. You could also experience a loss of rental income due to an unforeseen disaster. The proper insurance may cover these things along with legal fees if you end up taking your tenant to court.

For some, becoming a landlord is all about on-the-job training. It can be a challenge, but in the end renting out your extra space can help you reap financial benefits.
 
From: http://www.trulia.com/tips

By: Becky Frost
Becky Frost is Senior Manager of Consumer Education for Experian Consumer Services, which offers credit monitoring products ProtectMyID®. Find Becky on Google Plus. Note: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the opinion or position of Trulia.com. This article is provided for general guidance and information. It is not intended as, nor should it be construed to be, legal, financial or other professional advice. Please consult with your attorney or financial advisor to discuss any legal or financial issues involved with credit decisions. Published by permission from ConsumerInfo.com, Inc., an Experian company. © 2014 ConsumerInfo.com, Inc. All rights reserved.

Monday, June 16, 2014

A Garage Inspection



This is the exterior of a townhome I was asked to inspect. During the inspection, I ran into a neighbor who told me that the roof of another garage, identical to the one pictured above two buildings down, had collapsed the previous winter under a snow load.

So, I decided to keep my eyes wide open as I went through the garage.



Above:  trusses and truss connections

Some defects you have to search for, and some are pretty obvious. These first two defects were obvious from the doorway:
  •     improper alterations; and
  •     improper bearing points.
Trusses cannot be altered in any way without the approval of a structural engineer. When you see plywood gussets added at truss connections like these triangular gussets, then an alteration of some sort has obviously been made and you have to recommend evaluation by a structural engineer.  So, that condition went into the report

Trusses are designed to bear loads at very specific points. Typical roof trusses should not touch any interior walls and should bear only on the exterior walls. The two trusses at the left of the above photo are bearing on an offset portion of the garage wall.
A portion of the structural roof load was being transferred to the bottom chords of the trusses at a point at which they were not designed to support a load.



Above:  the connection

Then I walked over and looked more closely at the connections where the trusses attached to the wall and found these problems:
  •     inadequate metal connector (hanger);
  •     inadequate fasteners (deck screws); and
  •     improper fastener installation (through drywall).
These trusses would have best been supported by bearing directly on wall framing. The next best solution would be an engineer-designed ledger or engineer-specified hardware. And that may have been how they were originally built, but by the time I inspected them, 24-foot roof trusses were supported by joist hangers designed to support 2x4 joists. The hangers were fastened with four gold deck screws each.

Gold deck screws are designed to resist withdrawal. Fasteners for metal connecters such as joist hangers are designed to resist shear.

Withdrawal force is like the force which would be generated if you grabbed the head of a fastener with pliers and tried to pull it straight out.

Shear force is what’s used if you take a pair of heavy-duty wire cutters and cut the fastener. Fasteners designed to resist withdrawal, such as deck screws, are weak in shear resistance.

So, there were drastically undersized metal connectors fastened by badly under-strength fasteners.

To make matters worse, the screws were fastened through drywall, which doesn’t support the shaft of the screw and degrades the connection even further.
 

Above:  gangnail integrity destroyed

And, once I looked really closely, I found more truss alterations. The gangnail had been pried loose and the spikes which form the actual mechanical connection were destroyed. In their place were a couple of bent-over nails. This condition represented a terrific loss of strength and this roof, too, was a candidate for catastrophic structural failure.

In summary, look carefully at connections for problems which may lead to structural issues, as some are more urgent than others.  Be sure to call these out in your report.  Also, all electrical receptacles in garages must be GFCI-protected, without exception.

InspectorSeek.com

From A Garage Inspection - Int'l Association of Certified Home Inspectors (InterNACHI) http://www.nachi.org/garage-inspection.htm#ixzz34bv1IbC7

Saturday, June 14, 2014

Make Sure You Know Where Your Emergency Shutoffs Are!


Emergency Utility Shutoffs 
Generally speaking, modern homes have a variety of safety shutoff devices for water, electricity and gas and/or fuel oil (if present). For safety, each gas device is required to have an individual shutoff. You can save yourself untold damage and dollars if you know how to quickly locate and operate your emergency utility shutoffs. Here are a few suggestions to do just that. 

Where are my shutoffs?
If there were an emergency situation, could you quickly and efficiently turn off your electricity, water and/or gas? Do you know where your emergency shutoffs are and how to use them? It could save you a lot of damage and money if water is cascading from a ceiling, electricity is arcing and sparking within your walls or you smell a gas leak. Here are Hints, provided by SitePro

Emergency Utility Shutoffs
Generally speaking, modern homes have a variety of safety shutoff devices for water, electricity and gas and/or fuel oil (if present). For safety, each gas device is required to have an individual shutoff. You can save yourself untold damage and dollars if you know how to quickly locate and operate your emergency utility shutoffs. Here are a few suggestions to do just that. 

Gas/Fuel Oil Shutoffs 
Typically the Main Gas Shutoff Valve is located on the meter pipe outside the house and looks about like the one below. Normally, if the valve is aligned with the pipe it is in the on position. Shutting it off will likely require the use of a wrench or pliers – so have some readily available.


Fuel oil shutoffs are located in a variety of indoor and outdoor locations. Ask your fuel oil supplier to show you where yours is and how to turn it off.

In multifamily units, condos and town homes the meters (and shutoff valves) are often grouped at the end of a multi-unit building like this (be sure you know which one is yours – ask the management company/homeowners association, or meter reader):



If you have both gas and electric connections for your dryer and you are an electric dryer – be sure the gas shut off valve is capped, so a toddler can’t open up a simple stopcock valve like this one and 
fill your house with gas:


Water Shutoffs
Usually newer homes with a public water supply will have an Emergency Water Shutoff in addition to the utility company shutoff. The utility company shutoff is normally co-located with the meter near the street. The residence valve may be a faucet handle (remember - “righty tighty, lefty loosey”) 


or a blade valve, often on the outside inlet pipe (aligned with pipe = ON: across pipe = OFF).



sometimes inset into an interior garage wall:


or maybe a closet:


The interior water shut offs are usually in the corner of the house nearest the outside water shutoff at the meter.

Electrical Shutoffs
In recent houses the main electrical shut off is located inside the service panel (usually a gray metal box located on an exterior wall, in the garage of sometimes in an interior closet that houses the circuit breakers). Here’s what the circuit breakers look like with the deadfront cover in place:


The Main Shutoff is centered at the top (sometimes bottom) of the panel and looks like a big light switch on its side. This one has the cover removed for inspection (something you should not do!!!)


Sometimes in multifamily unit buildings the main shut off for an individual unit is located in a common utility room for the entire floor (which may be locked – be sure and check!!), typically nearby the meter and numbered such as this:



or at an outside location typical of condos (again normally labeled with the unit number) such as this:


or sometimes pole-mounted such as this:



Older homes may have plug fuses,


which are normally inserted in a fuse panel somewhat like this:



or cartridge fuses

 

and a panel more or less like this with its own shutoff (the blue metal loop at the right center) – pull it down to break the contact.




Both types often have a manual disconnect knife type switch with a handle that looks something
like this:

 
r

 (Raise the Handle to disconnect)

If you have questions about your main utility shutoffs – ask your utility company, homeowner association or property management company, as appropriate, for help. If you ever have an emergency situation and need to quickly shut off gas, water of electricity – you’ll be glad you did!



SitePro, LLC
Van Hibberts


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Thursday, June 12, 2014

"We'll Buy Back Your Home Guarantee" - Exclusive to SitePro Inspection Company in the Panhandle of Florida

No other Home Inspection Company in the Panhandle of Florida will make this offer or guarantee based upon the quality of inspections they provide. SitePro believes in the quality of inspections they give their clients by providing this guarantee.



Here are the no-frills terms of this groundbreaking Buy-Back Guarantee:

  • ·         Honored for 90 days after closing.
  • ·         Valid for home inspections performed for home buyers by participating InterNACHI members.
  • ·         We'll pay whatever price the client paid for the home.
  • ·         The guarantee excludes homes with material defects not present at the time of the inspection, or not required to be inspected per InterNACHI's Residential Standards of Practice.
Home buyers can buy a home worry-free when they have it inspected by a participating InterNACHI member. If they’re not happy within the first 90 days after buying it, InterNACHI will buy back the home at full price.

Real estate agents can be assured that their clients can now buy with confidence.

Van Hibberts, CMI

Certified Residential Building Code Inspector ICC-5319905
IBHS Fortified  Certified Inspector  #FEV32561020109 
ARA Certified Inspector #20302 (Applied Research Associates)
Florida-State Certified Master Inspector Lic. #HI 89
Certified Owens-Corning Roof Data Inspector
Florida-Certified Wind Mitigation Inspector
WDO Certificate #JE190791 
InterNACHI #10071802
362 Gulf Breeze Parkway, #214
Gulf Breeze, Florida 32561
850.934.6800  (Office)                                          
850.485.3209  (Cell / Text Msg)                          

"Looking Beyond The Obvious"


Nothing in this message is intended to constitute an electronic signature unless a specific statement to the contrary is included in this message.

DISCLAIMER: The information in this communication is confidential and may be legally privileged. It is intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom it is addressed and other authorized to receive it. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution or taking any action in reliance of the contents of this information is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful. If you have received this message in error, please contact the sender immediately by return e-mail. SitePro LLC is neither liable for the proper nor complete transmission of the information contained in this communication nor for any delay in its receipt.

SitePro Residential and Commercial Inspections has taken every reasonable precaution to ensure that any attachment to this e-mail has been swept for viruses. However, we cannot accept liability for any damage sustained as a result of viruses and would advise that you carry out your own virus check before opening any attachment. This e-mail is meant to communicate company related materials only. Opinions expressed by the author of this e-mail are solely his/her own. SitePro Residential and Commericial Inspections will not be liable for opinions expressed in this e-mail.

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Taping Windows To Prep For Hurricane Is Dangerous, Weather Experts Warn


(TALLAHASSEE, FL) Enter some text here to introduce the newsletter to your customers.It's dangerous to apply masking tape, duct tape and/or window film on windows or glass doors in preparation for a hurricane because it can create larger and deadlier shards of glass when broken.
This warning from the Federal Alliance for Safe Homes (FLASH)® comes amid some otherwise well-meaning advice to the contrary as millions of people living in the path of Hurricane Sandy look for last-minute safety measures as the monster storm approaches.

"It is simply a myth to think windows and glass doors should be taped in preparation for a hurricane," said FLASH President and CEO Leslie Chapman-Henderson. "Masking tape, duct tape and specially marketed 'hurricane tape' are insufficient and potentially dangerous substitutions for tested and approved hurricane shutters, impact-resistant windows or properly installed temporary, emergency plywood shutters."

Chapman-Henderson said experts, including FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate, Director of the National Hurricane Center Dr. Rick Knabb and FLASH have worked tirelessly in the months leading up to hurricane season to educate Americans on the truth behind this long-standing myth about the use of tape as a preparatory measure.

"And yet, we're still seeing and hearing people advise folks to do otherwise," she said. "The truth is, tape does not keep dangerous debris from coming into the home or prevent all glass from shattering. Doing so gives families a false sense of security. Even worse, tape can create larger shards of glass that can heighten danger. Applying tape wastes precious preparedness time and money that is better spent on tested and approved emergency or permanent hurricane protection."

Earlier this year, a FLASH survey conducted by Harris Interactive found that nearly seven out of 10 homeowners still think that windows and glass doors should be taped in preparation for a hurricane.

"This is why we are determined to continue to bust the dangerous window taping myth and are encouraging Americans to Go Tapeless® as part of its hurricane preparedness initiative," Chapman-Henderson said.

There is still time for families at risk to prepare for Hurricane Sandy. FLASH has step-by-step instructions for last minute preparedness activities that, in as little as one hour, can make homes and families safer and better prepared for potential severe weather.
Read entire article at Flash.org for more tips:

Sunday, June 8, 2014

Staging helps spotlight your home's best side

Maria Sapuppo needed to sell her comfy bi-level with five bedrooms and three bathrooms last year, but her real estate agent warned that it looked a little too "lived-in" as it was and suggested staging it. Sapuppo, a River Vale, N.J., mother of two, agreed, since she said she had a hard time looking at her house as a stranger would view it. She couldn't envision it any other way.

How to prepare your home for a quick sale

Though real estate agents have been advising clients on how to prepare their homes for sale for decades, staging has become more detailed and focused. Companies specializing in the art of staging are also starting to emerge.

"It's de-cluttering, neutralizing colors and showcasing highlights of the home such as hardwood floors," said Roberta Whitley Gomez, who staged Sapuppo's home and is the owner of Whitley Realty in New Milford, N.J.

Proper staging can mean 6 percent to 20 percent more on a sale, and it can help sell the home more quickly, experts say. Properties that have been staged typically spend 73 percent less time on the market, according to the Real Estate Staging Association.

How should a house look after staging? As the adage says, less is more.

Sapuppo, on the advice of Whitley Gomez, removed almost all of the furniture. Bedrooms had a bed, a chair and a decorative piece, such as a basket with flowers.

"We had no dressers — underwear and socks were in a basket at the bottom of my closet," Sapuppo said. "We took out anything that was personal."

The trick to staging, experts say, is to remove anything that makes the house look as if, well, as if it's yours. Take down those photographs of the grandkids, religious symbols and all that stuff on the refrigerator.

You want potential buyers to be able to imagine their own belongings in the home, yet you still need some items to show the actual size of the rooms.

"It's an oxymoron, but rooms look smaller with nothing in them," said Joyce Fierstat, a rental consultant with Cort Furniture in Hasbrouck Heights, N.J., where about a third of the company's business is staging homes. "With an empty bedroom, it's really difficult to tell what size bed would fit comfortably.

"You also want to use furniture or (other) items to draw the eye to the most pleasing part of the home," Fierstat said. "If you have spectacular views out a big picture window, you want a couch below it to draw your eye there. But if you have a concrete wall outside that window, you want curtains over it and the couch on a different wall."

Tips for doing it yourself

Most homeowners do their own staging based on their real estate agent's advice. In addition to having owners remove all manner of tchotchkes, experts say the staging tips below are necessary to get top dollar for your home.

Clean, clean and then clean some more. Who wants a house with a shower stall lined in mildew? Windows should sparkle to let in every glimmer of natural light, floors should be crumb-free and the furniture clear of dust.

Make sure the tidiness stretches outside the house. Paint the front door, clear the walkway and driveway, make sure lights are working and fixtures gleam. Add a splash of color to that front door with a wreath.

Neutralize colors throughout the house. That vibrant teal in your daughter's bedroom? The I'm-so-tired-of-living-in-a-beige-house purple you painted the little bathroom? Douse them with off-white.

Sellers need to focus on anything broken that they've been living with and ignoring. Fix that dripping faucet in the bathroom that no one uses or the cracked tile you forgot about by the back door.

Staging a house has its costs — but it has its rewards, too

Costs for renting items through a company can range from $2,500 to $5,000, depending on how much furniture and how many accessories are used and the length of time the house is on the market.

"Our prices range from about $300 to $350 a month per room," said Fierstat from Cort Furniture. "Let's face it: A home needs to be priced right to sell, but staging can definitely make a difference."

Sapuppo, who sold her home in four months, attributes the relatively quick sale mainly to staging.

"My home was the type of house where teenagers grew up with friends — happy and comfy," Sapuppo said.

"But Roberta had a vision when she looked at it, and when she was done, the house just flowed. She made the whole place more open, so it looked like we were living there, yet it wasn't personalized. Kind of amazing."

By Barbara Williams, 
The Record (Hackensack, N.J.)

Friday, June 6, 2014 6:58pm

Friday, June 6, 2014

Tips on Hiring a Contractor After a Flood Disaster

What type of contractor do I need to repair my flooded home?

If your home has been damaged by a flood, you may need to hire the services of professionals to mitigate the damages, handle any damaged personal property, or perform repairs. Typically, contractors who specialize in flood mitigation and repair are most familiar with the techniques and processes that this type of work requires. Contractors who specialize in flood damage remediation or "flood restoration contractors" understand the proper procedures necessary to restore and/or dry out a home or building and its contents. Some of the specialized equipment they may include: truck mounted and portable vacuums or water extractors, high velocity air movers, dehumidifiers, and moisture meters to monitor the drying process.

Residential home re-modelers or custom home builders may not have the experience that flood restoration contractors have in this field and may not have the expertise to properly mitigate the damage and/or prevent increased levels of microbial growth (mold). If mold becomes a concern, you may need to hire a certified industrial hygienist to test for mold and provide a restoration protocol or guidelines to mitigate any mold issues. Keep in mind that if you have insurance, your homeowners' insurance policy may have very little or no coverage for mold remediation, so contact your insurance company to find out if you have coverage and what your limits are. Mold remediation can be very expensive!

Usually after a flood, the restoration process will have three main components:
  •     The first is the structural drying phase. This is where the water and moisture is removed along with any materials that cannot be saved such as warped or damaged flooring, baseboard, wet drywall, etc.
  •     The second component is the handling of any personal property. This may entail packing up all of the contents of the home including clothing, furniture, or other items and storing and/or restoring them offsite until the structural repairs are completed. This phase also may require the creation of an inventory to document or list any personal property that may have been damaged beyond repair and that needs to be replaced.
  •     The third phase in the restoration project is the structural repair. This entails the restoration of building elements that need to be repaired or replaced, including insulation, drywall, baseboards, cabinetry, flooring, painting, etc. In some cases a single restoration contractor may offer to perform all three phases or you may want to choose one company to handle the drying while other companies handle the contents and structural repair.
Before you sign a contract for flood remediation services, consider the following:

  •     Read every word of the contract and be sure you understand the terms and conditions.
  •     Review any fee schedule that details what the charges will be for labor and equipment.
  •     Get an estimate of what the drying process may cost before any work begins. Any costs or charges that your insurance company does not cover or pay for, you may be held personally responsible to pay.
  •     Obtain copies of certificates of general liability and workers compensation insurance and be sure the policies are current and in force.
  •     Obtain copies of any Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) if the contractor intends to use any chemicals, anti-microbial agents, or other substances in your home that could cause adverse health effects.
  •     Check references and affiliations with trade organizations and the Better Business Bureau.
  •     Photograph and document your home, its contents, and the extent of any damages prior to anything being done or moved.
As a first hand witness to literally thousands of homes and businesses damaged or destroyed by disasters, Sean Scott, a second generation building contractor specializing in disaster restoration, became aware that survivors were ill equipped to take the next steps to recovery. Unaided, or misguided, disaster survivors struggled to successfully navigate the complex process. Necessity became the mother of invention and The Red Guide to Recovery, a resource handbook for disaster survivors, was born.

The Red Guide to Recovery provides the disaster survivor with a simple, easy-to-use resource that walks them step-by-step through the recovery process to help quell the chaos after any disaster.

The Red Guide to Recovery offers 14 chapters on helpful topics and is available as an eBook, Mobile App, and in print (limited availability). Find out more at: http://www.theredguidetorecovery.com/the-red-guide/get-the-red-guide-to-recovery/

Get our FREE tools and find out more about The Red Guide! Download our Personal Property Inventory "Memory Jogger", pre-filled with thousands of items to aid in your home inventory: http://www.theredguidetorecovery.com/recovery-tools/personal-property-memory-jogger/
 
By: Sean Monroe Scott


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Sean_Monroe_Scott

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/6908220

Wednesday, June 4, 2014

Drains and Sump Pumps

In some homes where the water table is high and drainage is poor, you have to deal with the excess water with drains or pumps. Drains are useful when there is a suitable location to hookup the pipes to. Often times you are facing a situation where there is on location low enough to have gravity do the job, and in these cases a pump is the best answer.

We recommend that you consider a backup pump in situations where its failure can cause significant damage or flooding. If there is a power failure or the pump breaks down, the backup can be very important.


One type of a backup pump is powered by the water supply to the home. These have the advantage of mechanically simple, relatively inexpensive and can do the job until you repair the primary pump or the power is restored. This type of pump does waste water, so they are not to be used as a primary pump, only a backup.

See a video on installing a water powered sump pump here.
http://www.thisoldhouse.com/toh/video/0,,20260244,00.html?bcpid=3698509001&bctid=1641902645

When the power goes out, you will be glad you have one!

Van Hibberts, CMI

http://siteprohomeinspections.blogspot.com/

Certified Residential Building Code Inspector ICC-5319905
Florida-State Certified Master Home Inspector Lic. #HI89
Florida-Certified Wind Mitigation Inspector
203(k) FHA/HUD Consultant #A0900
WDO Certificate #JE190791
NACHI #10071802

362 Gulf Breeze Parkway, #214
Gulf Breeze, Florida 32561
850.934.6800  (Office)
850.485.3209  (Cell / Text Msg)

"Looking Beyond The Obvious"
www.sitepro.us
www.navarrehomeinspections.com
www.navarrehomeinspectors.com
www.pensacolahomeinspectors.com

Nothing in this message is intended to constitute an electronic signature unless a specific statement to the contrary is included in this message.

DISCLAIMER: The information in this communication is confidential and may be legally privileged. It is intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom it is addressed and other authorized to receive it. If you are not the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that any disclosure, copying, distribution or taking any action in reliance of the contents of this information is strictly prohibited and may be unlawful. If you have received this message in error, please contact the sender immediately by return e-mail. SitePro LLC is neither liable for the proper nor complete transmission of the information contained in this communication nor for any delay in its receipt.

 SitePro Residential and Commericial Inspections has taken every reasonable precaution to ensure that any attachment to this e-mail has been swept for viruses. However, we cannot accept liability for any damage sustained as a result of viruses and would advise that you carry out your own virus check before opening any attachment. This e-mail is meant to communicate company related materials only. Opinions expressed by the author of this e-mail are solely his/her own. SitePro Residential and Commericial Inspections will not be liable for opinions expressed in this e-mail.

Monday, June 2, 2014

Water Problems and Solutions Under Your Home, Contact a SitePro Home Inspector


The most common source of water under homes is ineffective downspouts and missing splash-blocks or drains.


Inspect them regularly for failing mounts, crushed downspouts, and proper drainage.

Water in crawlspaces or basements can cause major damage. Many homes have water problems and the solutions can range significantly in cost to remedy. You always should start with the simple and cheapest solutions.

Gutters and Downspout


Gutter mounts failing and the downspout is disconnected


Keep downspout drains clear.

Everyone should walk around their homes in the worst weather, at least a few times a year and look to see how the gutters and downspouts are working. Moss, leaves or other debris can easily clog downspouts and gutters will overflow, possibly causing damage to roofs, fascia and soffits as well as flooding areas below grade.

Keep then cleaned and maintained, make sure all downspouts are discharging away from the building. If the water puddles next to the foundation, it is likely to end up in the basement of crawlspace. Make sure mounts are tight and there are no low spots along gutter runs.

Clean them at least once a year, usually after the leaves have dropped in fall. Some homes need more frequent cleaning.

Grading
If there is a negative grade (soil sloped to the home) water may puddle next to the foundation. Where possible, always have soil graded away from the structure. Consider repairing any concrete walks or patios that may slope to the home

Be careful with landscaping edging and planter boxes, as they often will cause water to puddle. Never allow downspouts to discharge in low areas like planters, but instead carry water several feet away from the building.

French Drains

This option is very effective at capturing water and draining it away before it can work its way under the home.

This is one example of a french drain:

They can be expensive, so it is advised that you check the gutters, downspouts, splash-blocks/drains and grading before opting for a french drainage system

Drains and Sump Pumps

In some homes where the water table is high and drainage is poor, you have to deal with the excess water with drains or pumps. Drains are useful when there is a suitable location to hookup the pipes to. Often times you are facing a situation where there is on location low enough to have gravity do the job, and in these cases a pump is the best answer.

We recommend that you consider a backup pump in situations where its failure can cause significant damage or flooding. If there is a power failure or the pump breaks down, the backup can be very important.


One type of a backup pump is powered by the water supply to the home. These have the advantage of mechanically simple, relatively inexpensive and can do the job until you repair the primary pump or the power is restored. This type of pump does waste water, so they are not to be used as a primary pump, only a backup.

See a video on installing a water powered sump pump here.


When the power goes out, you will be glad you have one!

Certified Residential Building Code Inspector ICC-5319905
Florida-State Certified Master Home Inspector Lic. #HI89
Florida-Certified Wind Mitigation Inspector
203(k) FHA/HUD Consultant #A0900
WDO Certificate #JE190791
NACHI #10071802

362 Gulf Breeze Parkway, #214
Gulf Breeze, Florida 32561
850.934.6800  (Office)
850.485.3209  (Cell / Text Msg)

"Looking Beyond The Obvious"
www.sitepro.us
www.navarrehomeinspections.com
www.navarrehomeinspectors.com
www.pensacolahomeinspectors.com

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